Story Time with Robert Frost

It’s amazing the kinds of things that happen as a kid that end up impacting you for years to come. Whether it’s being up on stage for the first time or getting to meet a celebrity in the flesh, those moments can leave a lasting impression that can mold us down the road.

This week I’m over on my Youtube channel talking about a unique experience I had with poetry when I was little. It was both exciting and nerve-wracking at the same time, and I thought it would be fun to share! I’ve been posting up a lot of tutorials for the past few weeks, and I wanted to do something a little different.

I hope you all enjoy this! Maybe I should do more story time videos in the future? What do you think?

Ten Years of Blogging and the Struggle of Realness

WordPress sent me a notification recently, one I really hadn’t expected, but apparently I’ve owned this site for ten whole years!

That’s just crazy to think about.

Looking back over my first post, it took me a while to really get comfortable with what to even blog about. I was struggling to figure out how to open up, and it was difficult to even feel comfortable talking about who I was or where I was from. That kind of honesty online felt dangerous, even though now it’s an everyday thing.

When I was growing up, and the internet was the wild west it was really frightening to use your real name online. Everybody used aliases for fear of being the victim of identity theft, which wasn’t really understood at the time. You had emails for different usernames, you carefully managed what information you gave out because everything was public. Very few messageboards were behind passwords, so everything you said and did was public. Nobody knew how that would affect job prospects, or health insurance opportunities. Mental illnesses just weren’t talked about.

Then came Facebook, and you had to use your real name to get setup. You originally had to enter your real university email address to have an account. Suddenly there were potential ramifications of things you did online, or at least, you thought there were. Oh boy, things sure have changed ten years later!

I had to think of this site as a “professional online portfolio” which sounds kind of ridiculous these days, but that was the equivalent. Slowly my blog grew out of my writing experiences, my progress, my struggles, my highs and lows. Slowly I started to understand my online presence and how it reflected a unique part of me, similar to how my writing does. I grew more comfortable in my online skin, I grew more comfortable in what I could share.

Today it’s easily the hub of my author business and I work hard to keep it updated (*eyes that header image real hard haha*). It’s as natural a part of my work as my writing, as Facebook, as Instagram, and YouTube. It’s taken me a while to fully embrace it, both its more casual aspects (the blog itself), and its more professional pieces (media kits, book listings, social media links, etc). It’s had a lot of modifications in the past ten years, and several complete revamps. I feel like it’s going to get another one soon once I carve out some time.

Some of you all have been following my blog since I first published my sword and sorcery short story in Short-Story.Me! (which has also had a heck of a site update over the years!) and it has gone on to get–

*squints*

A whopping 58,500 views? Holy cow!

I guess what I’m trying to say is that I’ve worked real hard to figure things out through this blog, and I appreciate you all for following me on my journey. Some of you have even been with me from the very start, and I can’t express how thankful I am for your support and motivation!

Here’s to ten more years of blogging, writing, learning, and figuring out this whole author thing.

Thanks for being here. ❤

Beware the Goats!

I first met Sarah through the Authors For Families charity drive. If you’ve followed my blog for the past year or so, you’ll notice that I’ve participated in this multiple times. Basically authors donate books, edits, read-throughs, etc. in exchange to donating to a select charity. I’ve seen the organization and coordination this takes behind the scenes. She works hard for a fantastic cause, and now in a few weeks we’ll be sharing a booth together at Decatur Book Festival!

Today her debut novel gets released, Double Crossing the Bridge. Although I haven’t gotten the chance to read it completely yet, I did read through the first chapter that got posted yesterday on the Parliament House Blog. This is such a fun and unusual world already and I’m really curious to read more!

Trolls, unicorns, and humans all exist – and somehow those dang billy goats always find a way to cause trouble! Congratulations on the book release, Sarah!

I’ve nabbed my copy already, have you?

(By the way, isn’t it weird that we’ve both written about trolls??)

Scrivener Tutorials: Keywords and Compiling

It’s really been a crazy week for me at the day job, and I just didn’t have the time to post my video on Scrivener keywords. So this Saturday you get a two tutorials in one post!

Keywords are perhaps the most powerful feature of Scrivener, and Compiling a manuscript is perhaps one of the most challenging ones. These two videos close out my tutorial series, but I’m now looking at other websites and software that I’ve used that might be helpful for other authors.

Take a look at the end of Part 7 to see some that I’m looking at tackling. If you have one you’re curious about, leave me a comment below!

Review: Henry Franks

After reading his fantastic novella, Eight Minutes, Thirty-Two Seconds, I was eager to hop into more of Peter Salomon’s work! Fortunately he’s got a few other books that he’s written, and this book, Henry Franks, was his first!

Instantly you get the kind of dark book this will be…

Finished: 6/26/2019

Henry Franks is a novel about a teenage boy with scars that are always itching and a terrible case of amnesia. He doesn’t remember anything that happened before the accident, and he suffers from not recognizing his own name or his own father. As Henry slowly unfurls out of his shell around his talkative neighbor, Justine, the newspapers are full of murder reports happening all across the quiet island of St. Simons island.

So first off, having grown up in Georgia myself, I love that this happens in a known Georgia location during specific years and during a very specific weather pattern. I think it’s incredible the amount of work and research it takes to create a world within that space, but Peter does a splendid job with it.

Another piece I want to include, and perhaps the part that made this book glow for me, is the clear knowledge of cognitive science and the effects of head trauma. People forgetting who relatives are and sometimes, more importantly, not having the same feelings of warmth as they used to are known side effects of that trauma. Read up on Capgras syndrome for more information on this very real phenomena.

What makes life worse for Henry is that his father seems untrustworthy. And you’re not sure if it is a case of head trauma or if he really is acting suspiciously. So you’re not sure if Henry’s lack of emotion for his father is truly from head trauma and amnesia, or if his father isn’t who he says he is.

Anyway, you get the idea of how tangled this story is and how much fun it is to unravel the mystery! I honestly love that about Peter’s books. The ending absolutely threw me for a loop too!

I am looking forward to getting to read more of Peter’s work!

What I consider a 5-star book:

  • Is it a fun read? I turned each page with growing concern, eager to unravel the mystery at hand, so yes, definitely a fun read!
  • Would you recommend it to others? Absolutely! I loved the twists and turns this book took, and the horrific encounters they had.
  • Does it stick with you? Definitely! It’s a storyline that you’ll find creeping into your mind again and again.

My overall rating: 5/5